teacher training: 19 Results found.


Covers of two books edited by Nicole Brown: Lived Experiences of Ableism in Academia: Strategies for Inclusion in Higher Education (Policy Press) und Ableism in Academia: Theorising Experiences of Disabilities and Chronic Illnesses in Higher Education (UCL Press)

Scheduled Ableism Events

It is with great excitement and pride that I share a list of scheduled ableism events. Celebrating the launch of my two edited books, find here events about Ableism in Academia.

Providing feedback for learning

Providing feedback is important to improve learning. So here are some examples for providing feedback that foster students' engagement.

Learning from the Korean context

This post shows the Korean educational context and how I have discovered that you can be half-way around the world, and yet nothing changes.

Playing games in lessons

Games are often used as motivators in lessons, but games shall not become the main focus. We are teachers and learning needs to be central to lessons.

Professional development portfolios

Many teacher training sessions and professional development courses nowadays link to or culminate in the compilation of portfolios. Portfolios are evidences and resources that are gathered and annotated systematically to provide an overview of the...

Assessment as a learning opportunity

Many teacher training sessions focus on assessment but we do not spend enough time on discussing assessment in the sense of marking student work. We do not discuss the impact marking has on the students' learning and the teachers' workload, nor do we talk...

Challenging students

I believe in challenging students and having high expectations of everyone in the classroom. This is coupled with appropriate support and guidance. However, challenging pupils is not an easy task and must be planned for meticulously.

Teaching with artefacts

Artefacts can be used to get students interested in a lesson, but artefacts can do more than just represent an engaging hook. In this post I am discussing the use of artefacts in lessons based on questions that I have been asked in teacher training...

The educational context

In teacher training there is a heavy focus on the educational context, but does the educational context really matter? Or is there a danger in being too reliant on statistical information relating to the educational context, in which we operate?